LexPredict Hackathon Challenge – Extracting Simple Contract Metadata

Beyond the specific prize attached to upcoming hackathon event, we welcome anyone who (for fun) would like to take a crack at this challenge.

Email us directly (Daniel Martin Katz or Mike Bommarito) – if you would like to work on this challenge.

Our LexPredict Challenge is an opportunity to develop basic tools for processing contracts.

Specifically, you will use the sample contract data below to develop algorithms to:
(1) identify the parties to an agreement
(2) identify effective date segment and date
(3) identify termination clause segment(s) and date(s)

At LexPredict, we have built this simple (and other more complex) technology for use in commercial applications.  This is an opportunity to use this challenge to produce open source content which we can be used by all (including in the Legal Analytics Course).

The Utility of Text: The Case of Amicus Briefs and the Supreme Court (by Yanchuan Sim, Bryan Routledge & Noah A. Smith)

From the Abstract: “We explore the idea that authoring a piece of text is an act of maximizing one’s expected utility. To make this idea concrete, we consider the societally important decisions of the Supreme Court of the United States. Extensive past work in quantitative political science provides a framework for empirically modeling the decisions of justices and how they relate to text. We incorporate into such a model texts authored by amici curiae (“friends of the court” separate from the litigants) who seek to weigh in on the decision, then explicitly model their goals in a random utility model. We demonstrate the benefits of this approach in improved vote prediction and the ability to perform counterfactual analysis.  (HT: R.C. Richards from Legal Informatics Blog)

Computational Law Workshop @ Stanford Code X

Today Mike Bommarito and I had the pleasure of participating in the Computational Law Workshop.  It was a very solid group featuring ~20 of the top global experts participating in a true workshop format about the pressing technical issues in computational law.  It was a great exchange of ideas!

 

A Case Study in Legal Annotation (Wyner, Peters & Katz)

legal_annotationThis is an ongoing project with Adam Wyner (Dept. of Computer Science @ University of Aberdeen) and Wim Peters (Dept. of Computer Science + NLP Group @ University of Sheffield) … our very initial pilot project was presented at the 2013 Jurix Conference.   Slides are located here and the case study paper for the pilot project is located here.  Hoping for more to come on this project in 2014!

Predictive Coding and E-Discovery in 2015 and Beyond – Presentation from LegalTechNYC 2013