Noise: How to Overcome the High, Hidden Cost of Inconsistent Decision Making (via Harvard Business Review)

screen-shot-2016-09-14-at-9-51-44-amFrom the article:  “The prevalence of noise has been demonstrated in several studies. Academic researchers have repeatedly confirmed that professionals often contradict their own prior judgments when given the same data on different occasions. For instance, when software developers were asked on two separate days to estimate the completion time for a given task, the hours they projected differed by 71%, on average. When pathologists made two assessments of the severity of biopsy results, the correlation between their ratings was only .61 (out of a perfect 1.0), indicating that they made inconsistent diagnoses quite frequently. Judgments made by different people are even more likely to diverge. Research has confirmed that in many tasks, experts’ decisions are highly variable: valuing stocks, appraising real estate,sentencing criminals, evaluating job performance, auditing financial statements, and more. The unavoidable conclusion is that professionals often make decisions that deviate significantly from those of their peers, from their own prior decisions, and from rules that they themselves claim to follow.”

Suffice to say we at LexPredict agree.  Indeed, building from our work on Fantasy SCOTUS where our expert crowd outperforms any known single alternative (including the highest ranked Fantasy SCOTUS player), we have recently launched LexSemble (our configurable crowdsourcing platform) in order to help legal and other related organizations make better decisions (in transactions, litigation, regulatory matters, etc.).

We are working to pilot with a number of industry partners interested in applying underwriting techniques to more rigorously support their decision making.  This is also an example of what we have been calling Fin(Legal)Tech (the financialization of law).  If you want to learn more please sign up for our Fin(Legal)Tech conference coming on November 4th in Chicago) (tickets are free but space is limited).

Artificial Intelligence and Law – 
A Six Part Primer

Above is my keynote address at the Janders Dean Legal Horizon Conference in Sydney. It is a mixture of some earlier talks I have given – together with some new materials.

Stanford CodeX Future Law 2016 Conference @ Stanford Law School

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Tomorrow I will be at the Stanford CodeX Future Law 2016 Conference @Stanford Law School.  I will be moderating the following panel:

Hot or Not – Watson and Beyond 

What data analytics technologies are in use today?
What’s real and what’s marketing buzz?
What’s possible in the foreseeable future?
What are the implications for providers and consumers of legal services?
What are the limitations?
What are the policy implications?

Moderator:
Professor Dan Katz,
Illinois Tech – Chicago-Kent College of Law, @computational

Speakers:
Noah Waisberg, Kira Systems, @nwaisb
Khalid Al-Kofahi, Thomson Reuters, @KKofahi
Charles Horowitz, The MITRE Corporation Informatics
Andrew Arruda, ROSS Intelligence, @AndrewArruda
Himabindu Lakkaraju, Stanford University, @hima_bindu

Vanderbilt Conference on Artificial Intelligence and the Law


Today I presented at Vanderbilt Conference on Artificial Intelligence and the Law – my afternoon talk was entitled – From Causal Inference to Predictive Analytics: AI Research by Legal Academics (and Beyond).

It was a great lineup here – from Richard Susskind to ROSS Intelligence (powered by IBM Watson) to many others …

The Legal Profession Hasn’t Changed in Decades. Here’s the Case for the Uberisation of It (via FT)


“The Uberisation of Law?” Quick shout out in the FT today for Mike, Josh and I (looking forward to releasing the revised version of the cited as well as and getting our Experts, Crowds and Algorithms paper out there as well)

How Artificial Intelligence is Transforming the Legal Profession (via ABA Journal)

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This month’s ABA Journal Cover Story is about Artificial Intelligence and Law where a wide range of companies and topics are highlighted.   Our work on #SCOTUS Prediction (which is being extended in a meta-ensemble of Experts, Crowds + Algorithms) is briefly discussed.  In addition, Denton’s NextLaw Labs (disclosure I am an advisory board member) is also highlighted.

The 16th International Conference on Artificial Intelligence and Law – King College London (June 2017)

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The program committee for the 16th International Conference on Artificial Intelligence and Law has just named King College London as the host for the biannual ICAIL conference.   Mark you calendars for 2017 in London!